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Things to ponder during

Financial Troubles

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Is your home dragging you down?

For many, a home and/or mortgage obligation can represent an enormous financial struggle, emotional burden, and time consumer – but it can also represent a tremendous store of potential value. And we’ll discuss these two popular positions here.

Financial Stress

Mortgage is just too big

A home represents the single largest investment most people make in their lifetime. And it isn’t uncommon for most Americans to assume a higher mortgage than they can comfortably afford. They often pin their hopes on inflation, employment stability, future income growth, and the payoff of other debts (like student loans) which would make a house payment more bearable as time goes on.

Even if the plan goes generally as planned many mortgage payments still find themselves adding tremendous financial pressure with each passing year. A tough mortgage payment will strain bank accounts, credit, time with family, and even a marriage. So, it’s not hard to imagine what happens when things don’t go according to plan. And here is where acting quickly may benefit you.

First, you need to remember that homes are sometimes slow-moving investments. Both in appreciation and in liquidation – homes are not like stocks that you can sell in the morning and have the funds in your bank account in the next 1 to 3 days. So if you sense trouble on the horizon, talking with a REALTOR® to understand the timeline involved may be key in mitigating any serious financial stress and concern.

Rule of Thumb

Many financial planners suggest that your house payment ought not exceed 25% of your household income. Yet, most lenders recommend that your house payment ought not exceed 36% of your household income – and the average household finds itself near or above this limit with many in higher-end homes teetering close to 45%.

Equity and Other DebtEquity and